CEDAR™ Feedback Model

The CEDAR™ Feedback Model is designed to give structured, effective feedback in a positive framework that allows self-reflection and improvement.
CEDAR Feedback Model Mutomorro
Download a free CEDAR™ Feedback Model Template

The CEDAR™ Feedback Model is a powerful tool that can be used to provide effective feedback in various professional and personal settings. This model helps individuals and teams to give and receive feedback in a constructive and impactful manner. In this article, we will explore the history of the CEDAR™ Feedback Model, how it can be used, and the five key parts that make up this model. By understanding and applying the CEDAR™ Feedback Model, you can enhance communication, promote growth, and drive positive change.

History of the CEDAR™ Feedback Model

The CEDAR™ Feedback Model was developed by Anna Wildman in 2003. Wildman recognised the need for a structured approach to feedback that goes beyond simply pointing out strengths and weaknesses. She conducted extensive research and drew upon his expertise in psychology and communication to create the CEDAR™ Feedback Model.

Over the years, the CEDAR™ Feedback Model has gained widespread recognition and has been adopted by numerous organisations and individuals. Its effectiveness in promoting constructive feedback and fostering personal and professional growth has made it a popular choice in various fields, including business, education, and leadership development.

How the CEDAR™ Feedback Model can be used

The CEDAR™ Feedback Model can be used in a wide range of situations, from performance evaluations in the workplace to personal development conversations with friends or family members. It provides a structured framework that ensures feedback is clear, specific, and actionable. By using the CEDAR™ Feedback Model, you can create an environment that encourages open and honest communication, fostering a culture of continuous improvement.

The 5 parts of the CEDAR™ Feedback Model

1. Context

CEDAR Feedback Model - 1. Context

The first part of the CEDAR™ Feedback Model is Context. This involves setting the stage for the feedback conversation by providing a brief summary of the situation or context in which the feedback is being given. It is important to establish a neutral and non-judgmental tone during this stage.

For example, if you are giving feedback to a colleague on a project they recently completed, you might start by summarising the goals and objectives of the project, as well as the key challenges they faced. This helps to ensure that both parties have a shared understanding of the context before moving on to the specific feedback.

Key points to consider:

  • Keep the context summary concise and relevant.
  • Focus on facts rather than opinions.
  • Use active listening skills to ensure understanding.

2. Examples

CEDAR Feedback Model - 2. Examples

The second part of the CEDAR™ Feedback Model is Examples. This is where you provide specific examples of behaviours or actions that support your feedback. It is important to be objective and specific when giving examples, avoiding generalizations or personal judgments.

For instance, if you are giving feedback to a team member on their communication skills, you could provide examples of specific instances where their communication was effective or ineffective. This helps to make the feedback more tangible and actionable.

Key points to consider:

  • Use concrete and recent examples.
  • Be specific about what was done well or could be improved.
  • Avoid using examples that may be perceived as personal attacks.

3. Diagnosis

CEDAR Feedback Model - 3. Diagnosis

The third part of the CEDAR™ Feedback Model is Diagnosis. This is where you analyse the examples provided and offer your diagnosis or interpretation of the behaviour or action. It is important to be objective and avoid making assumptions or judgments.

For example, if you are giving feedback to a team member on their problem-solving skills, you might diagnose that they tend to jump to conclusions without fully considering all the available information. This helps the recipient of the feedback to understand the underlying issues and identify areas for improvement.

Key points to consider:

  • Offer your diagnosis in a non-judgmental and constructive manner.
  • Focus on the behavior or action, rather than the person.
  • Provide specific suggestions for improvement.

4. Action

CEDAR Feedback Model - 4. Action

The fourth part of the CEDAR™ Feedback Model is Action. This is where you discuss the actions or steps that can be taken to address the feedback and improve performance. It is important to involve the recipient of the feedback in this process and encourage them to take ownership of their development.

For example, if you are giving feedback to a team member on their time management skills, you could discuss specific strategies or tools that can help them prioritise tasks and meet deadlines. This empowers the individual to take action and make positive changes.

Key points to consider:

  • Collaborate with the recipient to identify actionable steps.
  • Provide support and resources to facilitate improvement.
  • Set clear expectations and follow up on progress.

5. Review

CEDAR Feedback Model - 5. Review

The fifth and final part of the CEDAR™ Feedback Model is Review. This involves reviewing the feedback conversation and reflecting on the key points discussed. It is important to summarise the main takeaways and ensure that both parties have a shared understanding of the feedback and the actions to be taken.

For example, you could summarize the key areas for improvement discussed during the feedback conversation and reiterate the support available to the recipient. This helps to reinforce the feedback and ensures that it is not forgotten or overlooked.

Key points to consider:

  • Summarize the main points discussed during the feedback conversation.
  • Seek feedback from the recipient on the usefulness of the conversation.
  • Schedule follow-up meetings to track progress and provide ongoing support.

Key points to consider to use the CEDAR™ Feedback Model effectively

To use the CEDAR™ Feedback Model effectively, keep the following key points in mind:

  1. Be specific and objective: Provide concrete examples and focus on behaviors or actions rather than personal judgments.
  2. Foster a safe and supportive environment: Create a culture that encourages open and honest communication, where feedback is seen as an opportunity for growth.
  3. Collaborate and involve the recipient: Involve the recipient in the feedback process, and empower them to take ownership of their development.
  4. Follow up and provide ongoing support: Schedule follow-up meetings to track progress and provide ongoing support as needed.

By incorporating these key points into your feedback conversations, you can maximize the effectiveness of the CEDAR™ Feedback Model and drive positive change.

Summary

The CEDAR™ Feedback Model is a structured framework that can be used to provide effective feedback in various professional and personal settings. By following the five key parts of the model – Context, Examples, Diagnosis, Action, and Review – you can ensure that your feedback is clear, specific, and actionable. Remember to foster a safe and supportive environment, collaborate with the recipient, and provide ongoing support. By utilising the CEDAR™ Feedback Model, you can enhance communication, promote growth, and drive positive change in your personal and professional relationships.

CEDAR™ Feedback Model Template

Click the link to download this template and use it to explore more effective feedback.

CEDAR Feedback Model Template

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 James Freeman-Gray 

I'm James. A change consultant and organisational development specialist. I've been working in people-centred change for over 15 years. I partner with causes, champions, teams & leaders on projects for social, environmental, technological & human good. If you think I can support in making your change a success, drop me a message. 

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